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The spicy project

By | 10.10.2020

There is ample research on chilies genome, its many varieties, the power of capsicums, but little on how it spread and how it was adopted into diverse cuisines.

the spicy project

This project will also look at how modern forces are influencing the spread of cuisines and chilies today. In order to explore the cultural side of chilies, and the diverse ways they are used in different places. I plan to conduct field research along the chili peppers 15th century global trek.

These cuisines, which exist all around the world, are defined by the chili pepper more than others, and by conducting field research in some of these countries I hope to better understand how this came about and see what the connections between chili usage and culture are.

I want to see how the chili was transformed by culture from its birth as a wild chili in the jungles of South America to its spread and usage in through the empires and diverse peoples of the Americas. Did this early use influence future use in the old world? By the 17th century, Europeans, who were partly responsible for bringing the chili pepper to India, had forgotten about its new world origins and now believed that it was native to India.

And who could really blame them, India is a hot chili haven, with food so spicy Europeans were warned to be careful trying anything. The story of the chili pepper in India is fascinating, as this was also where Pepperthe milder, former king of spices, originated from. I will also explore how chilies are used in different parts of India, and how Indian and regional identity is so closely tied to spicy food.

The chili pepper, though, broke through these barriers, and was adopted whole-heartedly. It is now heavily used nearly all the countries famous national dishes. Perhaps no place in the world uses chilies in such unique ways — fermented, with honey, so many varieties of paste.

Korea, with its unique culture and history, provides a good case study to see how culture influences chili usage and adoption, allowing us to understand how the chili pepper was able to use its power to transform even the farthest kingdoms of the world. The chili pepper, though, was an afterthought, but its impacts on Indonesian cuisine far transcended that of any other spice.

This chapter looks at how Indonesia, far from the origin of chilies, created its own unique identity around the chilies. I also want to see how in a country so diverse, with over languages, chili usage also finds amazingly unique and interesting roles on different islands. Can level of spice be a metaphor for cultural difference?

I want to show, through several venues, how, in many ways, chili peppers were the original globalizing force, transforming our cuisine and, in many ways, our identities. Telling this story will show how closely connected the world is through the simple power of a fruit from the jungles of South America. Because this is the 21st century, and the internet, while not as spicy as the chili pepper, also is a globalizing force, this project will be interactive, tapping into the power of the worldwide network.

This will allow all the great content to be in a single place, and also allow the project to reach places where internet access is not yet available. Are you a publisher?

Articles — I will be regularly posting articles on the chili pepper here and in print publications, along with updates from field sites. I am looking for writers, photographers, videographers, translators, and travelers from all around the world to assist in gathering information, posting content, conducting research, and more.

I am also actively seeking funding for this project, and also seeking publishers for the final book. Stay up to date on the latest chili pepper findings, project updates, and get access to exclusive multimedia content! What is the connection between the chili pepper and cultural identity, and how did this identity originate? Field Research Tracing the Chilies Path In order to explore the cultural side of chilies, and the diverse ways they are used in different places.

Want to Participate? Join our List! I'm in! Pin It on Pinterest.This segment is part of the Chili Peppers spotlight. Plus, Science Friday video producer Luke Groskin tells us how how capsaicin—the molecule in chili peppers that binds to your heat sensors— sets off the spicy chemical reaction in your body. The following images are courtesy of New Mexico State University.

Do you know a chili head? They might keep a little packet of chili flakes in their bag so they can dip into it in a pinch. So what makes someone a spice addict and another person go running for the milk? Does that milk trick really work to extinguish the flames? Can you build up a tolerance for a spice? Welcome to Science Friday. Is that the same type of reaction that happens when you drink a hot cup of coffee?

Is it the same thing going on in there? For the most part, it is. Most people call it TRPV1.

USP – Uluguru Spice Project

And what happens is when you drink a hot cup of coffee or the capsaicin binds to that receptor, the receptor opens up, ions flood in, those ions trigger the cell to become receptive. You have a signal that goes through the nervous pathway all the way to your brain that says, this is hot.

This is hot. The difference here is that when you drink a really hot cup of coffee, you can actually destroy cells. You can burn yourself. Is that true? So those are possibilities. You know, it does release endorphins in your brain. So I gave people the choice of tasting the spicy sauce or the less spicy sauce. It was actually the same sauce. But beyond getting some really great reactions from the staff, which you can see in the video— some people make some really interesting expressions when they have something really spicy— everybody said they experienced roughly the same amount of heat.

They all felt it in the same place in their mouth at roughly the same time. What they differed in was how they experienced it— whether they enjoyed it more. And the people that went for the more spicy sauce— those are the ones that clearly were enjoying the heat a lot more. But inside of milk is two different things— you got fat and you got casein. And capsaicin— the molecule that causes the heat— has a long non-polar tail on it.

So ice cream or milk definitely works. Can the peppers and the capsaicin hurt your intestinal lining? But really, the capsaicin itself is not going to damage you, unless you have a ghost pepper or something like that. Thank you very much. Luke Groskin, our Science Friday video producer.

And you can watch that video where we subjected SciFri office members to spice on our website. When your mouth is burning and your eyes are tearing up, it can be hard to appreciate the subtleties of a spicy pepper. How can the tingle of a jalapeno differ from the searing burn of a habanero?Flanders is ideally suited to play a leading role in the shift towards a bio-based economy for a number of reasons. First of all, there is a long-standing tradition of biomass sugar beets, wheat conversion into food ingredients sugars, organic acids, alcoholic beverages.

On top of that, Flanders has a high level of education in both chemical and agricultural technology leading to a strong expertise in collecting, sorting and processing of biomass waste towards high value products. Cancellation of the EU Sugar quota as of October 1 th will have important consequences for the European sugar producers, such as evolution of sugar prices towards prices on the global market.

Together with the disappearance of the export limitations, this will lead to new opportunities for sugar as feedstock for production of chemicals and materials. Market analysts also expect an increase of EU sucrose and glucose syrup production. The main aim of SPICY is to provide chemical industry with new or optimized processes to convert sugars into added value compounds, i. Both will aspire to meet industrial standards of productivity, titer, yield and selectivity, to safeguard potential economic benefit and future industrial valorisation.

Most of the targeted platform chemicals are potential monomers for biobased plastics, hence, a second aim of SPICY is to deliver proof-of-concept of their usefulness by targeting novel and functional polymeric materials, typically not found in the current oil-based value chain.

This project has the ambition to strengthen the position of Flanders in terms of research into biobased processes and materials. The relevance of this cluster SBO project is further emphasized by an industrial advisory board, who are eager to implement the results and create economic valorisation.

Share on Facebook Share. Share on Twitter Tweet. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. I Understand.With a subsidy of over 2. The project is coordinated by Prof. Flanders is ideally suited to play a leading role in the shift towards a bio-based economy for a number of reasons. First of all, there is a long-standing tradition of biomass sugar beets, wheat conversion into food ingredients sugars, organic acids, alcoholic beverages. On top of that, Flanders has a high level of education in both chemical and agricultural technology leading to a strong expertise in collecting, sorting and processing of biomass waste towards high value products.

Cancellation of the EU Sugar quota as off October 1th will have important consequences for the European sugar producers, such as evolution of sugar prices towards prices on the global market.

Together with the disappearance of the export limitations, this will lead to new opportunities for sugar as feedstock for production of chemicals and materials. Market analysts also expect an increase of EU sucrose and glucose syrup production. The main goal of SPICY is to provide chemical industry with new or optimized processes to convert sugars into added value compounds, i.

Two complementary lines are hereto developed in parallel, one focusing on biotechnology based on improved yeast-strains and one based on chemocatalytic routes. Both will aspire to meet industrial standards of productivity, titer, yield and selectivity, to safeguard potential economic benefit and future industrial valorisation.

Most of the targeted platform chemicals are potential monomers for biobased plastics, hence, a second aim of SPICY is to deliver proof-of-concept of their usefulness by targeting novel and functional polymeric materials, typically not found in the current oil-based value chain.

Spices Factory - A Small Processing Unit

This project has the ambition to strengthen the position of Flanders in terms of research into biobased processes and materials.

The relevance of this cluster SBO project is further emphasized by an industrial advisory board, who are eager to implement the results and create economic valorisation. Share on Facebook Share. Share on Twitter Tweet.

By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. I Understand.The S ustainable P ackaging I nitiative for C osm E tics — SPICE — is an initiative that brings together organizations in the cosmetics industry to work towards a common goal: to collectively shape the future of sustainable packaging.

SPICE is developping and publishing business-oriented methodologies and data to support resilient decision-making to improve the environmental performance of the entire packaging value chain. For more than a decade, we have been committed to innovating our packaging toward sustainability. Quantis is honored to co-lead SPICE and guide major players in the cosmetics industry on this ambitious journey. Packaging is an important lever for cosmetics sustainability strategies and we know we will go farther, faster together.

CEO Quantis. Who are the members? How to join? Agenda Publications Press Contact. Cosmetic industry players unite to collectively shape the future of sustainable packaging.

Guide sustainable packagin g policy development based on a science-driven methodology. Drive packaging innovation with objective eco-design criteria.

Provide consumers transparency on packaging environmental performance. Read the primer. Spice Co-Founders. Corporate Members. Associate Members.The SPICE project collects and assesses current practices of public procurements for sustainable transport and mobility projects in Europe, and shares good practices with other public procurers. The project aims to facilitate dialogues between public procurers and industry suppliers and develop recommendations on procurement procedures in order to enable fast adoption of innovative and sustainable technologies.

The project will assist public authorities to use this collection of best practices and the recommendations through capacity building and knowledge transfer activities.

Finally, using the project platform, SPICE will form a number of common buyer groups to work on strategies on how to plan joint, cross-border procurement actions for their sustainable transport projects. You can click here to download the Factsheet of the project. About the project. Consortium Coordinator:. Work Plan. First Name. Last Name. We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue to use this site we will assume that you are happy with it.The overall goal of the Uluguru Spice Project is to empower small-scale farmers in the Ruvu river catchment area in the Uluguru mountains in Tanzania by facilitating knowledge of sustainable cultivation methods as well as marketing strategies with the main focus on spice production and trade, thereby achieving a poverty reduction accompanied with protection of the ecosystem.

the spicy project

The expected results are that small-scale farmers in the Ruvu river catchment are skilled in sustainable agroecological methods, governmental agricultural extension officers are trained, and a curriculum to teach model-farmers from all over Tanzania at SAT Farmer Training Centre FTC is elaborated.

Hereby farmers will be benefiting from a strengthened spice value chain focussing on direct processing at the farm, product development and market access. Altogether, farmers, 90 model-farmers and 15 governmental agricultural extension officers will benefit directly from the Uluguru Spice Project. Moreover, open source information will be available to a broad audience, comprising marketing through internet and social media as well as throughout annual agricultural events in Tanzania.

the spicy project

In addition, through the implementation of water protection measures, the project will benefit many more people. To reach the target groups, a series of activities will be carried out.

First, farmers will be mobilized to build groups or to collaborate with already existing groups. Here we pay especially attention on gender balance and encourage women to take over leading positions. In the next step, farmer groups will be trained in agroecological practices with focus on spices, but without excluding other existentially important agricultural areas such as the cultivation of crops.

Parallel to the agroecological training, the farmers will be taught in other sectors such as leadership, marketing, documentation, value addition as well as processing and storing. To this, saving and lending groups will be established to fund investments of group members. To ensure the best possible marketing of the products, workshops with interested representatives of the spice value chain as well as farmers will be organized. Additionally, participatory market research will be carried out with the marketing committees of the groups.

This approach of a diverse marketing strategy will lower the risk of farmers and encourage them to effectively collaborate in the implementation of the project. In addition, by training the government extension officers, SAT will enhance the capacity of the officers and ensures sustainability of the project.

The Uluguru Mountains provide habitat for various endemic plant and animal species and are therefore a biological hotspot in east Africa. Moreover, the Uluguru Mountains are of significant importance for the inhabitants of Tanzania because the steep slopes are source of the most important water catchment area in the country.

They feed the Ruvu River, which provides drinking water for the largest city in Tanzania, Dar es Salaam. During the presidential electionall the candidates addressed the delicate water situation as one of the most important issues. To guarantee water supply for the fast-growing population, water conservation measurements are indispensable. This can be achieved by sustainable land use, realized through agroecological cultivation methods, reforestation and protection of the existing tree stock.

Spice cultivation is very suitable to such areas, because of many of the cultivated spices find shade under the trees and if needed can climb up the existing vegetation.

About the project

Conventional agriculture comes mostly with monoculture and is therefore especially prone to erosion. SAT already implemented a market study in the project area. The study showed that farmers are interested in the cultivation of spices and that some of them already are producing spices today. Though, the prevalent poverty in the region indicates lack of access to the market for the farmers.

To this, the farmers are not organized yet and do not follow any quality criteria, what makes it even more difficult to negotiate for a good price. Skip to content Close Menu. Share this: Twitter Facebook.


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